Skating Rink Video 

 Scroll down for David's thoughts on hockey...
About the video:

The weather was perfect!

As it was almost every evening last winter, the rink was alive with skaters of all ages out for a pick-up game of hockey... and our good friend, Tony Girardin, and his buddies, Tom Peacock and Patrick Houston, filmed the scene and put it together in a delightful "almost" 3 minute video of David's song, Skating Rink.

From lacing up skates to flooding the rink after everyone goes home, this video is real (including the laughter and the sound of skates on ice) and the stars are ordinary folks enjoying themselves - and for free! What do they say about the best things in life?

No beer, no barely dressed women (too cold!)...just good Canadian fun. This video is a tribute to what goes on every winter in many small towns across the colder regions of North America.

The superb musicians you here on the video are none other than Dave Clarke on guitar and Geoff Somers on guitar and fiddle


We had VHS copies(outdated now!)made in case anyone wanted one of their own, a DVD version will be available soon!

That being said, if you would like to buy the VHS version click here for a printable order form.

yours,

Beth

"Its simplicity is its charm. Set at an outdoor ice rink in Anywhere, Canada the photographer has filmed kids playing hockey and, believe it or not, having fun. They have David singing the song on the sidelines over the action. He is actually playing the game in some of the scenes, as is his wife... The song and the video strike a strong cultural chord. What is more Canadian than racing up and down and outdoor rink with a group of friends and chasing a puck with sticks. It is cold and breath is steaming up the air. I can smell the hot chocolate through the screen of my TV." - A review of the video by Russ Musgrove


David Francey on Hockey

My family immigrated to Canada from Ayrshire, Scotland. Ever since my first introduction to hockey in the Sixties, when the Leafs were winning cups and all was right with the world, I've loved the game. I would watch "Hockey Night in Canada" with my father and would play ball hockey until the streetlights came on or the curfew siren blew at the mill.

I came to the playing of the game late in life. That memorable day arrived when I was 30 years old and living in Toronto. I came across an ad in the paper touting the National Novice Hockey Association, fronted by none other than Gordie Howe. The association's intent was to provide a league in which the teams were made up of people who had never before played organized hockey. Up to that point I had never had the opportunity to play on a real team. A good friend and I signed up. That season we had a series of practices and games. On the first shift of the first game, my first pass became an assist on the very first goal. It was utterly thrilling.

Gordie Howe skated with us at the end of the season, lacing them up with the rest of the boys. He had arms the size of my thighs and was quietly worshipped by all. At one point during that unforgettable game I managed to tip the puck past Gordie at the blue line and started breaking for the net. Next thing I knew there was a hook, a laugh and then Gordie had the puck back. It took him two strides - I didn't really care - I'd been personally hooked by the man himself, and that was enough. At game's end both teams lined up on one side of centre ice and Gordie went behind the opposing goal, put the puck on the tip of his upturned stick and proceeded to stickhandle through our combined flailings. The resulting goal was inevitable. I can't see a picture of him to this day without remembering how generous he was with his time and how kind and encouraging he was with us.

Since that time I have played as a forward, a defenseman and a goalie. I still skate as though I am wearing snowshoes but that doesn't matter. I still support the Leafs and watch "Hockey Night in Canada" as often as I can. I've had to give up my spot on the Sunday night team, as the weekends now find me away at a performance more often than not. I do miss the game and the boys and the talk in the locker room. I still play when I get the chance, mostly at the outdoor rink across the road from my house. What better place could there be to play, after all.







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!! View an internet version of the video - click here


 

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